LSC’s Dietram Scheufele co-edits handbook on the science of science communication

Friday June 16th, the Oxford University Press released The Oxford Handbook of the Science of Science Communication. The book, co-edited by LSC professor Dietram Scheufele, Kathleen Hall Jamieson of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania, and Dan Kahan of Yale Law School, provides a comprehensive overview of the current issues and challenges facing science communication.

Dietram holds a copy of The Oxford Handbook of the Science of Science Communication at the Oxford University Press book display at ICA’s annual conference.

The handbook features essays from the leading scholars in science communication including LSC professor and chair Dominique Brossard and LSC faculty affiliate Michael Xenos. Many LSC alumni also contributed including Heather Akin (who will be an assistant professor at the University of Missouri this fall), Nan Li of Texas Tech University, and Sara K. Yeo of the University of Utah.

“For a long time, the scientific community has relied on intuition rather than empirical data when it came to communicating the value of science to different political and public audiences,” says Scheufele.  “The handbook brings together some of the very best social scientists whose work helps us approach science communication from a truly scientific perspective.”

The handbook provides case studies of past science communication successes and failures, and identifies human biases that often affect the ways in which scientific information is processed.  In addition, the book takes the next step and provides ways to overcome biases – such as selective exposure, motivated reasoning and the availability heuristic – and discusses how these biases are exacerbated by the changing media environment.

More information and purchase information is available at the Oxford University Press.

LSC classes collaborate with the City of Monona through UW’s UniverCity Year Program

Story by Sarah Krier. Sarah is an undergraduate student majoring in LSC and the Department of Life Sciences Communication 2016-17 Lenore Landry Scholar

The 2016-2017 academic year marked the first year of the University of Wisconsin’s UniverCity Year program, where twenty-three classes across campus teamed up with the City of Monona to work on projects aimed at helping the city address key programs. The Department of Life Sciences Communication continued our tradition of engaging with Wisconsin communities by having two classes team up with UniverCity to help the City of Monona tackle projects while providing students an opportunity to immerse themselves in real-world professional experiences. One of LSC’s capstone classes developed a city-wide leaf management campaign, while students in LSC’s Information Radio class produced public service announcements for the city.
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LSC’s science communication colloquium featured an exciting lineup

This semester’s LSC science communication colloquium brought acclaimed speakers from near and far. Every week of the semester attendees of the colloquium heard from experts in bioethics, science communication, scientific art, science and technology studies, science policy, and new information technologies, among other interesting areas.

Check out the list of speakers below. You can click each speakers’ name for more information about them. After each speaker, a link by their names will take you to a video and audio stream of their talk.  Continue reading

Alumni profile: LSC grad Sara Schoenborn leverages her education to achieve success in diverse fields

Graduates from the Department of Life Sciences Communication go on to have successful careers in a wide range of industries – partly because the knowledge they learn at LSC can be applied to a wide variety of jobs.  LSC alum, Sara Schoenborn (BS ’10) has used her expertise for a successful career.

Sara Schoenborn

After graduating, Sara pursued her dream of working in the media industry, working as the assistant editor for Agri-View, an agricultural newspaper in Wisconsin.  Sara, who was also a Dairy Science major, found the job to be a perfect mix of her passions. While at Agri-View, she put to use the skills she learned at LSC, including researching and writing stories with compelling narratives, creating a strong digital media footprint, and designing print layouts.  She also used the knowledge she learned in her classes to ensure she was portraying individuals in a fair and balanced way.

After approximately three years she decided it was time for a new challenge. In the spring of 2013, Sara became the executive director of Wisconsin FFA Foundation – an organization dedicated to making a positive difference in students’ lives through agricultural education. “I really viewed my job as a way to give back to an organization I was a part of while I was in high school. It was my opportunity to give back and carry on that tradition for other students,” Sara said.
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LSC professor Dietram Scheufele helps outline the future of science communication research in NASEM report

The Department of Life Sciences Communication has long been a strong contributor to the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. That relationship continued when LSC professor Dietram Scheufele was asked by the National Research Council to serve as the vice chair for NASEM’s ‘Science of Science Communication’ committee.  The committee’s report titled, “Communicating Science Effectively: A Research Agenda” was released today.

communicating-science-effectivelyThe panel brought together a diverse group of scientists and science communicators with the goal of creating a report to help guide research on how to communicate about controversial science effectively.

The report includes an analysis of what is currently known about effective modes of communication, an overview of the major challenges for science communication, and outlines areas for future research to promote more effective communication.
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Recent LSC graduate brings knowledge and skills to new Wisconsin startup

Undergraduate alumna of the Department of Life Sciences Communication leave campus with strong theoretical knowledge, valuable communication skills, and lasting connections.  That was certainly the case for LSC graduate Megan Madsen, BS 2011.

While a LSC undergraduate student, Madsen interned at IceCube Neutrino Observatory.  She was also involved in the UW-Madison National Agri-Marketing Association chapter (NAMA) and the NAMA marketing team.  While a part of the NAMA marketing team Madsen worked alongside fellow students to create and present a comprehensive marketing plan for a product not yet introduced to the market. LSC Faculty Associate Sarah Botham serves as the NAMA faculty advisor, and it was during this time that Madsen and Botham formed a strong mentor relationship.

After graduating Madsen continued to use her science communication skills at IceCube, where she worked full-time as a community and education coordinator for over four years. During that time, Madsen further developed the skills and knowledge she gained at LSC and continued to nurture the relationships she made while a student at UW-Madison.

LSC grad Megan Madsen and LSC Faculty Associate Sarah Botham

LSC grad Megan Madsen and LSC Faculty Associate Sarah Botham

When it came time for a new challenge, Madsen reached out to Botham for professional guidance.  Botham, who is an entrepreneur as well as a writer, consultant and educator, had the perfect opportunity.  She had recently started a new business – WiscoBoxes™ – a themed gift box company that features only and all Wisconsin products in boxes with themes such as a badger box, a baby box, a chocolate and wine box, and others. Madsen is now the brand manager for WiscoBoxes where she is at work designing a company website, conducting market research and developing product guidelines for the company.
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Alumni profile: Q & A with 2014 LSC grad and digital communications specialist Paige Miller

A passion for nutrition, health, and communication led Paige Miller to the Department of Life Sciences Communication (LSC). A 2014 Bachelor of Science graduate of LSC, she brings the skill sets and theories she picked up in LSC to her position as a digital communications specialist for Legato Healthcare Marketing near Green Bay, Wis. LSC sat down with Miller to ask her about how she uses her education and why her time with LSC is so valuable to her.

Question: Can you describe what your current position entails and explain how a UW–Madison and LSC education has been useful to you?

Paige MillerMiller: As a digital communications specialist at Legato Healthcare Marketing, I work with our clients—mostly rural hospitals and specialty clinics—on developing digital marketing strategies. I get to work with our account teams to align digital strategies with overall marketing goals, and I work with our creative team to ensure our digital content follows best practices. I’ve worked on everything from brand awareness campaigns for hospitals to promoting new primary care clinics and specialty service lines like urology, orthopedics and gastroenterology. Most of my projects involve keyword research, content creation, social strategy, SEO/SEM and analytics. I have a huge role in website redesigns; my job is to create the structure and navigation for sites and make sure the content is optimized for search. So I build the sitemaps and make sure the design will be easy to use for people visiting the site. My favorite projects to work on are content marketing plans that promote health and wellness and encourage audiences to take an active role in their health. Continue reading

New semester brings new opportunities for LSC students

Life Sciences Communication University of Wisconsin MadisonTuesday, September 6th, marks the start of the fall semester and we are excited to welcome students back to Hiram Smith Hall. The faculty and staff at the Department of Life Sciences Communication are looking forward to meeting new and returning graduate and undergraduate students as they begin their classes.

We have many exciting classes and projects going on this fall in LSC and we hope to see students from across the department involved.
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LSC courses offer exciting opportunities for learning this summer

LSC is continuing its commitment to student learning through four stimulating summer classes.  Courses vary in topic from social media to visual communication, and this year three of the four classes are offered online to allow students across the globe to experience the LSC curriculum.

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Online classes provide UW students around the globe the opportunity to participate in LSC coursework.

“We are proud of our portfolio of three online courses this summer, from ethnic studies to social media and visualizing science. UW students living anywhere in the country or around the globe can earn UW credit with Internet access. For instance, my online students include some currently based in Europe, South America and the Middle East,” notes Shiela Reaves, LSC Director of Undergraduate Studies.
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Wolfgang Hoffmann, long-time filmmaker and photographer for CALS, dies at 69

The following is a press release published by the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences which has been republished here.

Wolfgang Hoffmann, who chronicled CALS on film for 45 years, passed away in his home on Tuesday, July 12, 2016. He was 69 years old.

Wolfgang HoffmannHoffmann was born and raised in Germany, where he completed studies at the Bavarian State Academy for Photography in 1970. The following year, he moved to the United States to take a position at UW-Madison as a filmmaker and photographer in the Department of Agricultural Journalism, now the Department of Life Sciences Communication (LSC). In this primarily outreach role, Hoffmann produced educational films and took photos illustrating a wide range of agricultural and natural resources subjects.

“Wolfgang was an outstanding photographer and filmmaker. His work was exacting and he produced wonderful films and photos that told the story he wanted to convey in beautiful ways,” says LSC emeritus professor Larry Meiller, who was Hoffmann’s colleague from the beginning. “At the same time he was a warm human being who made friends easily and was liked by virtually everyone. We are fortunate to have had him as a colleague and, even more, as a great friend.”

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