LSC helps host Communicating Science workshop

The Department of Life Sciences Communication partnered with the Arts Institute and other entities across campus to put on a one-day Communicating Science training for UW-Madison scientists on Monday, March 30. LSC professor Dietram Scheufele gave the opening plenary talk titled “The Science of Science Communication: Why Knowing Your Audience Matters.” Ron Seely, LSC senior lecturer and award-winning science writer, was in charge of the written storytelling session.

Dietram Scheufele discusses the science of science communication in his plenary at the Communicating Science workshop.

Dietram Scheufele discusses the science of science communication in his plenary at the Communicating Science workshop.

“It was very exciting to bring together so many parts of campus to help scientists learn the importance of communicating their work,” said Dominique Brossard, chair of LSC. “The lines between science, politics and society increasingly blur in today’s rapidly changing media environment and it’s essential for scientists to know their way around those issues.”

The Communicating Science training helped scientists learn techniques and ideas to better communicate with their various audiences, such as the public, the media, government officials, each other, and potential sources of funding.

Participants in the Communicating Science workshop discuss what they've learned in the Bringing it All Together session. Photo by Aliza Rand.

Participants in the Communicating Science workshop discuss what they’ve learned in the Bringing it All Together session. Photo by Aliza Rand.

“It was especially exciting to partner with the Department of Life Sciences Communication, which has led the way for science communication,” said Norma Saldivar, executive director of the Arts Institute. “As we develop the UW-Madison approach to teaching this material, LSC’s history as a pioneer in the theory and practice of science communication brings a crucial research perspective. As interest in science communication explodes nationally, we profoundly appreciate this truly multidisciplinary collaboration and look forward to being part of the innovation happening here on our campus.”

The training incorporated oral storytelling, written storytelling, as well as science communication theory.

Were you not able to attend? Fill out this web form to receive info about future Communicating Science events.