Alumni profile: Laura Strugnell gives a voice to the next generation of agricultural research

In Spring 2017, Laura Strugnell (B.S. ’17) tapped the mail icon on her phone and found an email sent to the Life Sciences Communication (LSC) undergraduate student listserv. Strugnell was searching for a job, and the email advertised a communications position in Texcoco, Mexico at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (know as CIMMYT for its Spanish name Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo). A Madison native, Strugnell hadn’t planned to get a job outside the U.S. However, she had taken a variety of agriculture classes and worked in a horticulture lab while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, so she knew about CIMMYT’s global reputation. The more she thought about it, the more convinced she became that working at CIMMYT could be a prime opportunity to put her LSC education to work.
November 3, 2017
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research
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LSC researchers explore security implications of gene editing

The following story was written by Brian Mattmiller of the Morgridge Institute for Research. It has been adapted and republished here.  [caption id="attachment_11516" align="aligncenter" width="613"] LSC professor Dietram Scheufele leads a panel and LSC chair Dominique Brossard serves as a panelist at an international workshop on genome editing security.[/caption] Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Life Sciences Communication participated in an international workshop this month on the intersection of genome editing technology and national security. The Oct. 11-13 conference, based in Hanover, Germany, assembled a global group of bioethics and government experts to address security questions on gene editing as they relate to human health, agriculture and the potential to genetically alter species. Experts from the United States and across Europe, China and India explored ideas for harmonizing gene editing policies across national borders.
October 20, 2017
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teaching-outreach
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LSC offers popular science writing course this spring

With so many complex current issues such as climate change, vaccination and gene editing that have not only scientific and technical dimensions, but also ethical and social implications, it has never been more important to communicate about science effectively. This Spring, the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Life Sciences Communication's popular course LSC 560: Scientific Writing will teach graduate students in scientific fields to do just that. In the course, LSC senior lecturer and award-winning journalist Ron Seely will share over 20 years of expertise as a science and environmental reporter working for the Wisconsin State Journal and as a freelancer to help students bring clarity and simplicity to complex scientific subjects. "LSC 560 gives graduate students a professional understanding of how to effectively communicate science and research findings to the public. It helps any scientist or science writer who needs to understand how and why their messages must change along with the ...
November 22, 2017
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students
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Recent Publications

  • Stenhouse, N. (2017). Spreading Success Beyond the Laboratory: Applying the RE-AIM Framework for Effective Environmental Communication Interventions at Scale.  (more…)

  • Scheufele, D. A., Xenos, M. A., Howell, E. L., Rose, K. M., Brossard, D., & Hardy, B. W. (2017). U.S. attitudes on human genome editing.  (more…)

  • Runge, K. K., Brossard, D., Scheufele, D. A., Rose, K. M., & Larson, B. J. (2017). The polls—Trends: Attitudes about food and food-related biotechnology.  (more…)

  • Kohl, P. (2017). Using De-extinction to Create Extinct Species Proxies; Natural History not Included. (more…)

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