LSC research methods course teaches students fundamental skills for success

You might not expect a single course to help prepare students for careers in advertising, journalism, market research, digital marketing, and public relations among others. But LSC 250: Research Methods in the Communication Industry does just that. The course teaches students the skills needed to synthesize and analyze data – an important skill in a broad range of fields. LSC 250 focuses on developing research method skills including understanding research reports and data, identifying markets, segmenting audiences, measuring attitudes and developing effective campaign strategies and messages. According to LSC chair Dominique Brossard, “The skills students learn in LSC 250 are fundamental for future academic research, but it is important to remember students will use those same skills when they graduate and move on to work in the industry.  Identifying and articulating trends in data is critical.” [caption id="attachment_11633" align="alignright" width="300"] LSC's Neil Stenhouse teaches students how to effectively communicate quantitative findings.[/caption] Through the course, ...
November 30, 2016
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research
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Recent LSC graduate brings knowledge and skills to new Wisconsin startup

Undergraduate alumna of the Department of Life Sciences Communication leave campus with strong theoretical knowledge, valuable communication skills, and lasting connections.  That was certainly the case for LSC graduate Megan Madsen, BS 2011. While a LSC undergraduate student, Madsen interned at IceCube Neutrino Observatory.  She was also involved in the UW-Madison National Agri-Marketing Association chapter (NAMA) and the NAMA marketing team.  While a part of the NAMA marketing team Madsen worked alongside fellow students to create and present a comprehensive marketing plan for a product not yet introduced to the market. LSC Faculty Associate Sarah Botham serves as the NAMA faculty advisor, and it was during this time that Madsen and Botham formed a strong mentor relationship. After graduating Madsen continued to use her science communication skills at IceCube, where she worked full-time as a community and education coordinator for over four years. During that time, Madsen further developed the skills and knowledge ...
November 14, 2016
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teaching-outreach
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Ph.D. student examines the relationship between technology, conservation and public opinion

Story by Sarah Krier. Sarah is an undergraduate student majoring in LSC and the Department of Life Sciences Communication 2016-17 Lenore Landry Scholar Populations of the Hawaiian honeycreeper, a colorful bird native to Hawaii, struggle to survive due to bird malaria transmitted by non-native mosquitos. Gene-editing and de-extinction techniques could offer promising avenues for adapting the species to adversity—but how does the public feel about these interventions? The relationship between public opinion and scientific interventions is exactly what Patrice Kohl, a doctoral student in the Department of Life Sciences Communication, is working to understand. Kohl takes an interdisciplinary look at how the public reacts to conservation efforts to prevent extinction, much like the Hawaiian honeycreeper. [caption id="attachment_11620" align="alignleft" width="264"] Patrice Kohl[/caption] Kohl was recently awarded an Integrated Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) fellowship from the National Science Foundation. IGERT funds graduate students across the country, encouraging research that fosters strong collaborative bonds across disciplines ...
November 22, 2016
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students
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Recent Publications

  • Witzling, L., Shaw, B., & Seiler, D. (2016). Segmenting boaters based on level of transience: outreach and policy implications for the prevention of aquatic invasive species.  (more…)

  • Stenhouse, N., Harper, A., Cai, X., Cobb, S., Nicotera, A., & Maibach, E. (2016). Conflict about Climate Change at the American Meteorological Society: Meteorologists’ Views on a Scientific and Organizational Controversy. (more…)

  • Kim, J., Brossard, D., Scheufele, D. A., & Xenos, M. (2016). “Shared” information in the age of big data: Exploring sentiment expression related to nuclear energy on Twitter. (more…)

  • Myers, T., Kotcher, J., Stenhouse, N., Anderson, A.A., Maibach, E., Beall, L., & Leiserowitz, A. (2016). Predictors of trust in the general science & climate science research of US federal agencies. (more…)

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